Flexible system design is key for CCTV ROI

November 10, 2009

IP is here and offers more than hybrid or analogue systems. So Mark Harraway argues here. Mike Tennent of Tavcom Training sets out the next part of his response below.

The sensible answer to all these issues (concering analogue, hybrid and IP technology) is for us to encourage progress and quality whilst coming to terms with the equipment we actually have available and using that to design cost effective solutions for the security and surveillance needs of clients that are both backwardly and forwardly compatible. Whatever the systems employed, the paramount consideration is to provide image quality that can be measured on a repeatable basis and will meet the expectations of the discerning user and the professional commissioning engineer.

In this way, system designs and installations should never need to come under the critical, eagle eyes of the expert witnesses! Tavcom’s consultants will not mind losing that strand of business if systems are working efficiently for the benefit of people and property.

To read the original “Dont Go Hybrid” article click here.

To read from the beginning of the Tavcom posts click here.

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Can you compare IP CCTV to CB radio?

November 9, 2009

IP is here and offers more than hybrid or analogue systems. So Mark Harraway argues here. Mike Tennent of Tavcom Training sets out the next part of his response below.

Progress for the CCTV industry is still in an embryonic state and we must ensure that we do not stifle positive technological advancements by insisting that one form of protocol is the only way forward. We cannot foresee the future and it may therefore be that IP itself may be destined to enjoy only a very limited life span. Alternative means of getting better quality, more manageable CCTV images from A to B in faster and cheaper ways are almost certain to appear. How many of you happen to remember the surge and equally fast decline of CB radio that we experienced many moons ago? History has a way of repeating itself.

To read the original “Dont Go Hybrid” article click here.

To read from the beginning of the Tavcom posts click here.


HD can improve the quality of CCTV

November 5, 2009

Mike Tennent of Tavcom Training sets out the next part of his response to Controlware’s Mark Harraway argument that IP is here and offers more than hybrid or analogue systems. 

In the face of this Beauty and Beast IP conundrum there is a very strong case for enterprising suppliers and integrators to provide hybrid security solutions for their clients. Cost effective systems can be deployed – and sensible Operational Requirements achieved – by using the best of the client’s existing equipment whilst bringing the control and management of the scheme ‘bang up to date’.

For example, I am aware of the new technology from JVC that enables the use of High Definition (HD) cameras across existing coaxial cable runs and produces quite stunning real time pictures of 25 to 30 images per second over 500 metres or so. This sort of innovative design thinking will save the user thousands of pounds, dollars or yen because, when using this system, there is only a need to upgrade to HD technology when the picture quality being produced by conventional cameras fails to meet a specific need.

HD is upon us and it will be commonly available in the 16:9 format in the blink of an eye. That, of course, means we will require even MORE bandwidth for IP solutions, even more storage space for the recorded images although – if we don’t compress or manipulate the CCTV images any more than we do nowadays with the resultant alarming reduction in picture quality – there will certainly be a marked improvement in imagery!

To read the original “Dont Go Hybrid” article click here.

To read from the beginning of the Tavcom posts click here.


Is IP the new kid on the block for CCTV?

November 4, 2009

IP is here and offers more than hybrid or analogue systems. So Mark Harraway argues here. Mike Tennent of Tavcom Training sets out the next part of his response below.

It is arguable that these traditional attitudes and problems may well affect the long term success and effectiveness of the new IP technology. For now, however, it is the new and very popular kid on the security block that can do no wrong! For many, in fact, it is now the only kid on the block … but with good reason? Let’s have a look at some of the arguments being put out about by the providers of ‘IP-only’ solutions. Many suppliers have a very narrow focal plane and say it is now the sole way forward and that there should be no other method of designing, installing and operating CCTV systems.

At Tavcom we have been teaching IP and networking solutions for the industry for the past 10 years now and I have always agreed with the opinion of thousands of installers and end users that whilst IP technology in concept is first class, in practice there are many instances where there is an insufficient supply of bandwidth to provide the images specified by the users for their operational needs.

What do you think? Is IP the only way forward for CCTV?

To read the original “Dont Go Hybrid” article click here.

To read from the beginning of the Tavcom posts click here.


Is IP CCTV Beauty and the Beast rolled into one?

November 3, 2009

Mike Tennent of Tavcom Training responds to “Dont go hybrid” by Mark Harraway of Controlware.

A simple analogy is that TCP resembles the sending of a registered envelope to a customer who must acknowledge receipt of the consignment with a signature. UDP is like sending an ordinary letter … you never really know if it arrives! So, in essence, this is really no different, in transmission terms, from coaxial cable, optical fibre, twisted pair, microwave, laser or other free space methods.

I suppose cynically-minded people would identify IP as Beauty and the Beast rolled into one! The beauties of IP are that today’s world is increasingly computer-based, the infrastructure of cable is built in, the young people of today are largely computer literate and the transfer of information from computer to computer is so much easier and quicker to perform than old, traditional methods of tape. The beastly part of the analogy is the inability to get a picture from A to B as quickly as you can on many other other forms of transmission. IP produces some form of latency (delay) across the newtwork. This may be perfectly acceptable to many but totally inappropriate in other cases. There is also an issue as to how many cameras can be used on one system at a time.

To read the original “Dont Go Hybrid” article click here.

To read from the beginning of the Tavcom posts click here.


Which CCTV technology to use? Industry debate continues

November 2, 2009

Since the publication of “the true Cost of IP CCTV” in the CCTV industry press there has been much debate concerning which technology to use.

Analogue, hybrid and IP CCTV all have their champions and we have seen some heated debate in favour of each technology both in the press and in forums such as the CCTV group on Linkedin.

While it can be argued that some manufacturers are saying what they are saying because they do not have an IP solution it must be said that the debate is an ideal opportunity for all elements of the industry to come together in order to discuss fundamental issues that affect the industry as a whole. This is healthy for the industry and the fact discussion is taking place in a transparent way with the participation of users is great too. Everyone has an opinion and it is a great thing that everyone has an opportunity to say what they want to say and this extends even here on the Controlware Blog where all on-topic comments are posted.

It is certainly true to say that no single technology fits all users at the moment and this is confirmed from the feedback coming out of these debates. We have been quite clear in outlining our preference for IP based CCTV transmission (based on the fact that IP is a global standard technology for integration of different applications – voice, data, video, broadcast video and as such offers the most ideal real-world workable solution today see here for more).

A word of caution though. Sometimes it is all too easy to discuss technology based on its merits alone. As an industry we must remember that the user is the most important person in all of this. Users buy the systems and at the end of the day have to live with them so as an industry that includes manufacturers, distributors (such as Controlware), installers, consultants and users we all have a duty of care to provide each user with the best possible solution for their needs.

Long may transparent debate continue because its healthy for the industry as a whole.

To read the latest from the ongoing debate join the CCTV group on Linkedin here.


Dont go hybrid, Tavcoms view: Analogue, Hybrid or IP CCTV

October 27, 2009

IP is here and offers more than hybrid or analogue systems. So Mark Harraway argues here. Mike Tennent of Tavcom Training sets out the first part of his response below.

Love them or loathe them, the number of electronic security systems deployed in our buildings and on our streets has burgeoned in recent years and, without a seismic reversal of public and political opinion, that trend is set to continue, not only in the UK but around the world. Hard facts and figures are not easy to come by and are invariably hotly disputed but there can be little argument that we are now – for better or worse – a locked in, locked out, closely watched and frequently recorded society. CCTV, access control, intruder alarm, perimeter defence and other electronic security systems are ubiquitous features of modern life.

This proliferation of technology has meant ‘boom times’ for those who grew up with this new industry but now the goalposts are on the move. The rapid cross pollination and convergence of technology involving the security, IT and other sectors is creating exciting new opportunities for installers from other sectors to enter the security arena and dramatically enhance their career prospects.

To read the original “Dont Go Hybrid” article by Mark Harraway click here.